Small gardens are often seen as having little or no scope for design. This couldn’t be further from the truth. You can squeeze a lot into a small plot: be bold, be strong, ensure a lavish backbone of evergreens with spring color to enliven spirits after the long winter gloom – and don’t forget to incorporate the scent. But remember, in small gardens, less is often more: it’s better to do one thing well rather than a lot in a muddled fashion.

Large gardens have an element of safety, deploying swathes of green lawn which is economical to install and covers large areas of ground. A small garden has to work much harder and, per sq meter, can cost more. But it’s worth it: with thought and care, your little patch can be a true extension of your home and provide a haven for you, as well as the wildlife we share our urban spaces with.

Before you start, measure your space and draw it to scale. This may sound ‘designery’, but will help you to figure out the plants and materials you need, what furniture will and will not work and, more importantly, what will fit through the access you have, if you don’t want to run the expense of a crane or lifting equipment.

READ THE ARTICLE https://www.theguardian.com

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More often than not, those new plants we pick up at nurseries or home improvement centers are in a plastic pot. As responsible gardeners, we all hate to simply throw those pots away and add them to the landfill. Most of those pots are made of recyclable plastic, but if you’ve watched a related episode […]

The post Top Ten Tips to Repurpose Plastic Pots appeared first on joe gardener® | Organic Gardening Like a Pro.

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It’s planting season in metro Detroit, and gardeners are getting ready to stock up on greenery.

From tiny urban gardens to rolling landscapes in the suburbs, here are 9 hot trends for 2019, according to horticultural experts.

No space? No problem

The biggest issue for most gardeners this year figuring out how to tackle a small garden. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, about 80% of Americans live in urban areas, which leaves little to no room for outdoor greenery.

According to the experts at plant supplier Proven Winners, consider opting for fastigate shrubs.

Fastigate plants are those that grow with branches sloping upward, nearly parallel to the main stem. These plants save on space by growing upward instead of outward. According to Proven Winners, bushes and shrubs that fit the bill yet offer a splash of color and interest include Hibiscus purple pillar, Rose of Sharon, Japanese holly, or elderberry.

READ THE REST OF THE TRENDS HERE https://www.freep.com

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We like to surround ourselves with friends, pets, fresh air, and sunshine, but have you ever considered the benefits of plants? According to some new research, living in the midst of healthy vegetation has proven to significantly extend one’s life expectancy.

Research coming directly out of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health as well as the Brigham and Women’s Hospital has analyzed the results of an eight-year-long study that specifically examined a potential link in place between thriving vegetation and an extended lifespan. According to the study, “Women in the U.S. who live in homes surrounded by more vegetation appear to have significantly lower mortality rates than those who live in areas with less vegetation” Essentially, women who live in greener surroundings have clearly been found with better mental health and mortality rates 12% lower than those living in homes without plants, in areas void of vegetation”.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE https://gardeningsoul.com

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Here are some useful tips that will help you grow healthy and delicious tomatoes in your garden:

Plant the tomato seedlings in pots, and poke holes underneath to prevent water stagnation.

In order to make them flourish and ripen, you should ensure they receive at least 8 hours of direct sunlight daily. Moreover, water the tomato seedlings twice a day, in the morning and in the evening.

They are ready to graduate to soil beds after about a month. Dig large holes to accommodate the seedling and its additives, of about 20-24 inches (50-60cm).  It would be best if they are spaced out by at least three feet (0.9m).

READ THE FULL ARTICLE https://gardeningsoul.com

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There’s more to being wise with water than efficient garden watering. I often mention that more plants die from overwatering than from underwatering. That’s the main reason I speak so often about making sure you have well-drained soil. In earlier parts of this 5-part series; I’ve covered selecting the right plants, water delivery methods, and watering […]

The post Watering Your Garden: How Much Is Enough and Sources: Pro Tips – Pt. 4 of 5 appeared first on joe gardener® | Organic Gardening Like a Pro.

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News Source https://aussieorganicgardening.com/2019/03/what-to-grow-in-april-2019/

If leaves on your citrus trees are looking pale, magnesium or iron deficiency are most likely the cause. This problem often appears in autumn. See: Pale citrus leaves.
Add compost to the bed where you plan to plant garlic during Full Moon phase later this month. Also check that soil pH is close to neutral (7.0). Gardeners in temperate climates can plant spring bulbs and lilies this month, and gardeners in temperate and cool climates can divide irises and daylilies. The following gardening advice is an abbreviated list for vegetables, fruit trees and some culinary herbs that can be sown or planted during February in Australia and New Zealand. A comprehensive monthly guide that includes planting times for the entire garden, as well as when to fertilise, prune, weed, take cuttings or divide plants, can be found in the diary section of my book Easy Organic Gardening and Moon Planting (Scribe Publications, 2006, 2009, 2012, 2017), and e-book (Booktopia 2012, 2017).

* For gardeners who do not use moon planting: sow or plant out any of the following list at any time this month, although you may find germination is weaker when the Moon is in Last Quarter phase.

WARM CLIMATE South of Rockhampton
Before the Full Moon, cabbage, headed and open Chinese cabbage, grain crops, lettuce, mizuna, radicchio, rocket, silver beet (pre-soak seed), spinach, tatsoi, coriander, and nasturtium can be sown directly into beds, also a green manure crop of, chick pea, white clover faba bean, field pea, cereal rye, Japanese millet, oats, triticale, or wheat. Celery, leek, spring onions, parsley, bulb fennel and chamomile can be sown or planted out.
During First Quarter phase, broad beans, fast maturing broccoli, peas and nasturtium can be sown directly into beds.
During Full Moon phase, carrot, garlic, radish, swede and turnip can be sown directly into beds, and early-season onion, mint, rosemary, thyme and watercress can be sown or planted out. Globe artichoke suckers, lemon grass, strawberries, pineapple, and evergreen trees, shrubs, and vines can be planted.

WARM CLIMATE Rockhampton and northwards
Before the Full Moon, cabbage, headed and open Chinese cabbage, grain crops, lettuce, mizuna, radicchio, rocket, silver beet (pre-soak seed), spinach, tatsoi, coriander, and nasturtium can be sown directly into beds, also a green manure crop of cereal rye, lablab, Japanese millet, oats, or triticale. Celery, leek, spring onions and parsley can be sown or planted out.
During First Quarter phase, bush and climbing beans, fast maturing broccoli, peas, and nasturtium can be sown directly into beds, and cucumber, pumpkin, rock melon, summer squash, tomato, watermelon and zucchini can be sown or planted out.
During Full Moon phase, beetroot (pre-soak seed), carrot, parsnip, potato, radish and swede can be sown directly into beds, and lemon grass, strawberries, pineapple, dandelion and oregano can be sown or planted out. Evergreen trees, shrubs, and vines can be planted.

TEMPERATE CLIMATE
Before the Full Moon, bulb fennel, cabbage, headed and open Chinese cabbage, grain crops, lettuce, mizuna, radicchio, rocket, spinach, tatsoi and coriander can be sown directly into beds, also a green manure crop of faba (broad) bean, field pea, barley, cereal rye, oats, triticale, or wheat. Chickpea can be sown in frost-free areas. Leek, spring onions, chamomile and parsley can be sown or planted out, also silver beet (pre-soak seed) in frost-free areas.
During First Quarter phase, broccoli can be sown directly into beds, also broad beans and peas in frost-free areas.
During Full Moon phase, radish, swede turnip, turnip, and garlic can be sown directly into beds, and early season onion can be sown or planted out. Globe artichoke suckers, strawberries and lemon grass can be planted, also evergreen trees, shrubs, and vines in frost-free areas.

COOL CLIMATE
Before the Full Moon, grain crops, lettuce, spinach can be sown directly into beds, also a green manure crop of faba (broad) bean, field pea, oats, or triticale. Leek can be planted out.
Avoid sowing broad beans and peas too early in frost areas. Although the plants are frost-hardy, the flowers are not.
During Full Moon phase, radish and turnip can be sown directly into beds, and early season onion can be sown or planted out. Swede and garlic can be sown in warmer areas, and raspberry and currants can be planted in cold areas.

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